Tag Archives: heroine

The Wish Granter by C. J. Redwine

Redd Becker Book Review

by C. J. RedwineC. J. Redwine writes with all the ingredients of her craft. She assembles protagonist, antagonist, helpers and obstacles with characters who grow within the telling.

The princess is a fun, food centric, tomboy, who’d rather not have become a princess. When her brother signs a contract with the Wish Granter, his life and kingdom are threatened. Princess Ari decides to save all, but it isn’t easy against one of the most powerful fairies alive.

I loved the food centric bits of the story. They make Ari personable, someone I’d like to know. It’s also refreshing to have an over-weight heroine, that’s compelling in all aspects of her personality.

Can use of POV thwart interest?

Redwine use of point-of-view (POV) interested me.  Writing in first person point-of-view (POV) from multiple characters proves effective in many novel. In The Wish Granter I questioned one perspective.

The story starts with Princess Ari’s POV, who introduces setting, challenges and primary characters. Toward the middle, the young weapon’s maker, Sebastian, becomes vital and his POV becomes more relevant. He introduces the reader to aspects of the world Princess Ari is not privy.

Andrews also choses to include the antagonists POV. Coincidentally, shortly after those sections, my interest in the story floundered. I didn’t care as much about Ari and Sebastion. Fortunately, I returned reading, but I wonder whether adding the protagonist’s POV, in this case, interfered with my commitment to Ari and Sebastian, hence my commitment to the novel at that point.

I particularly liked how Redwine inferred the next chapter’s POV in the wind-up of previous chapters. Although the references are often oblique, for me, they effectively set my subconscious up for the change in POV. As a writer this is worth noting.

C. J. Redwine’s attention to the craft

Redwine has a fondness for double alliterations. Rhetorical devices of this nature lighten the read and help drive descriptions forward. She uses anaphora (repeating words at the beginning of sentences), epistrophe (repeating words at the end of sentences), anadiplosis (repeating words at the end of one sentence and the beginning of the next), and the use of structural parallelism (to enhance the cadence of paragraphs) all freely.

A twist in the plot around page fifty, ramps up the tension. Andrew’s attention to full character development, in all aspects of their lives, brings new interest to this old fairy tale.

For a short version of Rumpelstiltskins click here. For other wonderful fairy tale retellings, check out Elle Enchanted or The Goose Girl.

The Wish Granter by C. J. RedwineThe Wish Granter (Ravenspire, #2) by C.J. Redwine
Series: , ,
Published by Balzer + Bray on February 14th 2017
Genres: Fantasy, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 432
Goodreads

An epic, romantic, and action-packed fantasy inspired by the tale of Rumpelstiltskin, about a bastard princess who must take on an evil fae to save her brother’s soul, from C. J. Redwine, the New York Times bestselling author of The Shadow Queen. Perfect for fans of Graceling and the Lunar Chronicles.

The world has turned upside down for Thad and Ari Glavan, the bastard twins of Súndraille’s king. Their mother was murdered. The royal family died mysteriously. And now Thad sits on the throne of a kingdom whose streets are suddenly overrun with violence he can’t stop.

Growing up ignored by the nobility, Ari never wanted to be a proper princess. And when Thad suddenly starts training Ari to take his place, she realizes that her brother’s ascension to the throne wasn’t fate. It was the work of a Wish Granter named Alistair Teague who tricked Thad into wishing away both the safety of his people and his soul in exchange for the crown.

So Ari recruits the help of Thad’s enigmatic new weapons master, Sebastian Vaughn, to teach her how to fight Teague. With secret ties to Teague’s criminal empire, Sebastian might just hold the key to discovering Alistair’s weaknesses, saving Ari’s brother—and herself.

But Teague is ruthless and more than ready to destroy anyone who dares stand in his way—and now he has his sights set on the princess. And if Ari can’t outwit him, she’ll lose Sebastian, her brother…and her soul.

Remember Yesterday by Pintip Dunn (Forget Tomorrow #2)

Redd Becker Book Review

Pintip Dunn fills every chapter of Remember Yesterday with driving action.  by Pintup DunnWe quickly learn our heroine’s sister, Callie, committed suicide to stop future memory research. The nation’s leader pushes on, however, with her vision to mold a society with precognition. A society that already knows its future because future selves send information backward in time. The chairwoman’s plans include winnowing out anyone who doesn’t have precognition. The young Jessa commits herself to fulfilling her sister’s wish to stop the project.

Jessa makes an intriguing heroine. She’s dynamic, conflicted and opinionated. Since she and her twin possessed the power of precognition, she believes she has a chance of stopping the research.

The tension of romance muddles Jessa’s perspective, however, when she collaborates with the young scientist, Tanner, to save her sister. Jessa is both aroused and ethically repelled by what Tanner represents to her. But the twist at the end puts their relationship in new light.

Pintip Dunn’s story comes full circle by the conclusion. Fresh imagery make this a fun read. This is the second book of the series, and Dunn leaves plenty of room to continue to story.

Pintip Dunn Wins the  RITA

Although Goodreads readers didn’t classify Dunn’s book in the Romance genre, Dunn won the RITA Award from the Romance Writers of America for Forget Tomorrow in 2016. Dunn placed in many other award lists as well, which recognizes her fresh writing style, intriguing heroines and driving plots.

For a list of 25 great paranormal romances, check out the  Best Fantasy Books website.

Remember Yesterday by Pintip Dunn (Forget Tomorrow #2)Remember Yesterday (Forget Tomorrow, #2) by Pintip Dunn
Published by Entangled: Teen on October 4th 2016
Genres: Fantasy, Dystopian, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 400
Goodreads

Follow-up to the New York Times bestselling novel, Forget Tomorrow!
Would you change the past to protect your future?
Sixteen-year-old Jessa Stone is the most valuable citizen in Eden City. Her psychic abilities could lead to significant scientific discoveries, if only she’d let TechRA study her. But ten years ago, the scientists kidnapped and experimented on her, leading to severe ramifications for her sister, Callie. She’d much rather break into their labs and sabotage their research—starting with Tanner Callahan, budding scientist and the boy she loathes most at school.
The past isn’t what she assumed, though—and neither is Tanner. He’s not the arrogant jerk she thought he was. And his research opens the door to the possibility that Jessa can rectify a fatal mistake made a decade earlier. She’ll do anything to change the past and save her sister—even if it means teaming up with the enemy she swore to defeat.

Sixth Grave on the Edge by Darynda Jones (Charley Davidson #6)

Redd Becker Book Review

Darynda Jones writes cross-genre novels that highlight romance, by Darynda Jonesmystery and the occult. Her writing style captures her protagonist’s sharp, irreverent personality and keeps you in Charley’s mind set. Jones breaks the traditional literary approach, but she punches her story up with fun similes, creative descriptions and unexpected subplots that take the reader on tangents into the world of angels, Lucifer’s children and the afterlife.

The protagonist, Charley, sees ghosts. She inherited the role of ‘grim reaper’ which gives her the power to help souls transition, but additional powers, hinted-at, lurk beneath the surface. With a compassionate perspective and defiant approach, Charley blunders forward resolving crisis for the living and dead alike.

To spice the story up romantically, the devil’s son, Reyes, entangles Charley in his sexy-hot tentacles which creates tension, titillation and intrigue.

For me, a muddled middle of subplots left me wondering. By the end I was left wondering. Many of the subplots don’t resolve cleanly and the ending opened as many doors as it closed. Regardless, plenty more books in the series carry Charley’s tale forward.

Darynda Jones Writes with Wit

Darynda Jones’ fresh writing (as writing coach, Margie Lawson, would say) entertains and keeps the reader captivated. Her characters verge on the hilarious; such as a corpse with a hard-on who rides shot-gun in her car.

A review on the first three Charley Davidson novels at FictionVixen provides the foundation for the series, although it contains spoilers.

Sixth Grave on the Edge by Darynda Jones (Charley Davidson #6)Sixth Grave on the Edge (Charley Davidson, #6) by Darynda Jones
Series: Charley Davidson #6
Published by St. Martin's Press on May 20th 2014
Genres: Fantasy, Paranormal, Mystery, Romance
Pages: 326
Goodreads

Few things in life can come between a grim reaper and her coffee, but the sexy, sultry son of Satan is one of them. Now that Reyes Farrow has asked for her hand, Charley Davidson feels it's time to learn more about his past, but Reyes is reluctant to open up. When the official FBI file of his childhood abduction lands in her lap, Charley decides to go behind her mysterious beau’s back and conduct her own investigation. Because what could go wrong?
Unfortunately, another case has fallen into her lap—one with dangerous implications. Some very insistent men want Charley to hunt down a witness who is scheduled to testify against their boss, a major player in the local crime syndicate. If Charley doesn't come up with an address in 48 hours, the people closest to her will start to disappear.
Add to that a desperate man in search of the soul he lost in a card game, a dogged mother determined to find the ghost of her son, and a beautiful, young Deaf boy haunted by his new ability to see the departed as clearly as he sees the living, and Charley has her hands full. The fact that Reyes has caught on to her latest venture only adds fuel to the inferno that he is. Good thing for Charley she's used to multi-tasking and always up for a challenge…especially when that challenge comes in the form of Reyes Farrow.

Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotson, a fun middle grade fantasy

Redd Becker Book Review

One of my children particularly enjoyed Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotson. Upon re-reading Which Witch by Eva Ibbotsonit, I understood why. What fun characters and lively descriptions.

The dark warlock, Arriman the Awful, wants to retire, but he can’t until someone replaces him. When no one appears, he decides to marry and have children who will one day take his place. The choice of wife is critical, because she must be the darkest of dark witches herself.

Which Witch will Win

Arriman’s assistant, Mr. Leadbetter,  sets up a competition at Arriman’s estate. They invited witches from the coven of Todcaster who will compete each day for the grand prize of marrying Arriman. The witches’ magic runs the gamut of gruesome to farcical. Their familiars, magical animal pets, play a vital role in the story; from Mother Bloodwort’s cloud of flies and the twin’s chickens, to Belladonna’s worm. All is written with tongue-in-cheek fun, consequently the contests create hysterically funny results.

A twist at the end winds up the tale with eloquent success. Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotson tickles the middle grade funny-bone, but we can all enjoy the laugh.

Eva Ibbotson castes her penchant for the humorous into plenty of other books you may want to read.

Which Witch? by Eva Ibbotson, a fun middle grade fantasyWhich Witch? by Eva Ibbotson, Annabel Large
Published by Puffin Books on July 3rd 2000
Genres: Fantasy, Middle Grade
Pages: 272
Goodreads

When Arriman the Awful, the handsome wizard of the North, announces a contest to choose his bride, every witch in town is a flutter. The meanest, most powerful witch will wed the wizard. But little Belladonna is dismayed, because as hard as she tries, her spells conjure up begonias and baby birds, and not a single viper or bloodshot eyeball. She just has to do something seriously sinister in time for the contest....

 

Dragon Rule, The Age of Fire series #5, by E. E. Knight

Redd Becker Book Review

Dragon Rule takes place in a world where dragons live along Dragon Rule by EE Knightside humans and, most importantly, dragons rule there. As expected, cooperation between the groups can be strained, but E. E. Knight focuses on tensions between dragons, rather than the human versus dragon relationship.

Although Knight starts and ends his novel with the Copper, the story diverges into his sister’s and brother’s lives. The reader follows subplots for many dragon characters. Although each is integral to the main story-line, subplots subsume the Copper’s struggle. Perhaps Knight planned for supporting characters to fight the Copper’s battles for him. With that said, no particular character engaged me so much that I burn for the next installment of The Age of Fire series.

If Knight intends a moral message, ‘blood is thicker than water’ appears a possibility. Copper and his brother and sister have very different personalities and morals, but when challenges confront the family, they stick together.

Nice descriptions of dragon environs, the Lavadome and  caves where dragons live helped establish settings, although in general the book lacked the due diligence I expect from an award winning novelist. Knight writes clearly with plenty of dialogue; however, typos occur too often, a complaint many reviews mention and I found unprofessional.

Dragon Rule: Book Five of The Age of Fire Series

It’s clear Knight enjoys writing about dragons. He personifies them with keen attention to their physical limitations, historical contrivances and builds cultures one may expect in a dragon world.

Perhaps because I didn’t read the first books in the series, Dragon Rule didn’t fully engage me. This book doesn’t stand on its own.  It appears written for current fans, as a bridge to the next installment of the series.

Dragon fans should check out the History of Dragons on the Draconsinka web site for some fun information on dragon lore in general.

Dragon Rule, The Age of Fire series #5, by E. E. KnightDragon Rule (Age of Fire, #5) by E.E. Knight
Series: Age of Fire #5
Published by Roc on December 1st 2009
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 320
Goodreads

The author of the national bestselling Vampire Earth series presents the fiery fifth book in his epic dragons saga.
Scattered across a continent, three dragon siblings are among the last of a dying breed?the final hope for their species? survival.
Wistala, sister to the Copper who is now Emperor of the Upper World, has long thought humans the equal of dragons. She leads the Firemaids, fierce female fighting dragons who support the Hominids of Hypatia. Which puts her at odds with both her brothers, for the Copper has no use for the humans he now dominates and AuRon, the rare scale-less grey, would isolate himself and his family from both the world of men and the world of dragons. But as the Copper?s empire roils with war, greed, and treachery, the time is fast approaching when Wistala will have to choose who to stand with? and fight for...

 

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi

Redd Becker Book Review

The True Confessions of Charlotte DoyleThe True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle, a coming-of-age adventure, leads the way with a dynamic heroine. Avi portrays Charlotte as smart, courageous and ‘willing to make things right’ when she makes mistakes. But as Charlotte faces a world more convoluted than her protected girl’s school had been, her moral compass requires fine tuning.

Avi mixes historical details well in this mystery adventure. Written in first person, Charlotte shows us the world of the high seas. Our thirteen year old heroine finds herself caught between captain and crew, when she transverses the Atlantic as the only female on a ship ripe for mutiny. Her naivety as a privileged girl, schooled at Barrington School for Better Girls in 1832, gets her in trouble when she does what they taught prudent. Their advice backfires and Charlotte finds herself an outcaste on a ship of ruffians.

In her desire to fix things, Charlotte joins the ship’s crew. She regains their respect because she’s willing to work hard, but she quickly finds herself accused of murder. The story and mystery of who committed the murder progresses with no shortage of action.

Charlotte Doyle’s story is a fun read, but thematic meanings are never far. The heroine’s innocence, due to gender and class, limits her at first, but she learns quickly and tries to make amends–regardless what it costs her. An unconventional ending leaves readers satisfied that the life lessons she learned will go to good use.

Newberry Book Honor Award for The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle received a Newberry Honor Book Award. Sometimes Newberry Honor books are overly literary, but Avi’s tale depicts a strong heroine in a fun, swashbuckling adventure. This makes it great to read in classrooms. Action keeps young readers engaged, while life messages lurk beneath the surface.

Schmoop provides a wonderfully insightful critique on the book, even if you don’t agree with all of it.

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by AviThe True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi
Published by HarperCollins on August 10th 2004
Genres: Adventure, Historical Fiction, Young Adult
Pages: 229
Goodreads

A vicious captain, a mutinous crew and a young girl caught in the middle. Not every thirteen-year-old girl is accused of murder, brought to trial, and found guilty. But I was just such a girl, and my story is worth relating even if it did happen years ago. Be warned, however: If strong ideas and action offend you, read no more. Find another companion to share your idle hours. For my part I intend to tell the truth as I lived it.

Bear Bait by Pamela Beason, author of Endangered

Bear BaitRedd Becker Book Review

Bear Bait, A Summer Westin Mystery, takes place in the Olympic National Forest.  Summer, a freelance writer/nature biologist, encounters everything from poaching, bombs, illegal mining and teens gone awry, but no wrong-doing passes without our heroine’s concern. She’s a strong, believable character with intellect, compassion and a bit of a self righteous temperament. Don’t we love it? She possesses an almost unhealthy commitment to endangered species and effectively entangles herself into every explosive situation she encounters, thus creating suspense at every turn.

Characters in Bear Bait

I enjoy Beason’s integration of characters from all walks of life. Persons of varied sexual orientation, heritage and status come alive with equal finesse. Varied political and environmental perspectives find a place in most characters. The inclusion of issues working for the National Park Service versus the United States Forest Service appeared authentic, although I hope over-emphasized.

The addition of teens provides an unexpectedly nice balance. Not many characters come through with great depth, but in general they represent a wide spectrum of perspectives from the naive, rebellious, self righteous and those deserving of redemption.

Romance hovers in the wings, but never dominates the mystery. It adds color and sometimes tension for Summer. Her love interest, Chase, is an FBI agent working on a case nearby. Chase’s story-line somewhat conveniently,  intersects the multi-threaded issues that ensnare Summer. One wonders if Chase’s motives are for real or are calculated to pull her along for his own agenda. The resolution of the romantic element at the end of the book disappointed.

Summer is often referred to as Sam in the story. I questioned this decision by the author, because it didn’t add to the story and could be confusing.

Although Beason takes us to Forks, Washington, the small town made famous in the Twilight series, she barely references the books.

Bottom line for Bear Bait

Bear Bait engulfs the reader in an engaging mystery that exposes many aspects of the environmental movement in the Northwest that doesn’t often present themselves to those in other parts of the country.

Goodreads gives Bear Bait a 4.2 star rating, which is a bit above the usual 3.4 or 3.5 average. For another reviewers perspective go to the blog Mysteries and My Musings where Ariel reviews three of Pamela Beason’s mysteries.

Bear Bait by Pamela Beason, author of EndangeredBear Bait (Summer Westin Mystery, #2) by Pamela Beason
Series: Summer Westin #2
Published by Berkley on October 2nd 2012
Genres: Adventure, Mystery
Pages: 320
Goodreads
five-stars

 Wildlife biologist and writer Summer “Sam” Westin loves the wilderness. But her latest attempt to protect nature may just get her burned… 
Sam Westin is working on a twelve-week project for the National Park Service as a biologist and a volunteer firewatcher when, one night, she hears an explosion. Above a nearby lake, fire lights the sky. She calls it in and is the first on the scene to do battle. When the blaze is finally extinguished, a body is discovered in the embers. It’s a young woman who was working on the park’s trail crew for the summer—and she’s still clinging to life.
Sensing something sinister, Sam starts asking questions. Who started the fire? Was the young woman involved? Does this have something to do with an old gold mine? Is the recent sighting of an illegal bear hunter just coincidence? Sam wants the answers—but someone else wants her out of the way before she finds them...